Tomatoes

  • $3.75–$8.50
    74 Days Old Amish heirloom dating back to the early 1900's. Ranks as one of the best-tasting paste tomatoes....
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  • $4.25
    Late Blight Resistant! The first step to a bumper crop is healthy plants. The disease resistant package keeps the...
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  • $5.45
    73 Days One of the most popular hybrid tomatoes. Plump, juicy, deep red fruits often weigh a pound or more. Also...
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  • $5.75–$12.95
    73 Days 1994 AAS Winner. Early and heavy yields of colossal-sized tomatoes with old-time flavor. Vigorous...
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  • $3.35–$12.95
    90 Days Legendary heirloom dating back to the 1800's. Considered by many to be the best tasting of all tomatoes....
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  • $6.25
    70 Days 1984 AAS Winner. Possibly the most widely adapted variety ever developed. Performs well from Canada...
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  • $6.05–$8.50
    57 Days Earliest tomato for slicing and it's hard to find a better flavor. Fruits are 4-6 ounces, slightly...
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  • $2.25
    80-85 Days Huge, pink-red, oxheart-type fruits usually weigh 1 pound. They are great for slicing, canning or...
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  • $4.95
    Harvest enough of these romas at one time to make a batch of salsa. The 2-2 1/2 ounce, red, tasty fruits ripen over...
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  • $3.35–$12.95
    85 Days The story of this tomato starts in the 30's when the owner of a radiator shop was facing bankruptcy. Even...
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  • $3.25
    75 day Paste. One of the most popular paste tomatoes! The bright red, pear shaped fruits are thick and meaty with...
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  • $3.75
    80 Days Slightly rectangular-shaped fruits are bright red and hang in large clusters on healthy, robust vines....
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Tomato Culture:
Sow in flats 6-8 weeks prior to transplanting outdoors. Soil temperature should be 75-85°F. Plant seed 1/4" deep, allowing 8-11 days for germination. When plants are 1-1/2" high, transplant into Jiffy Pots. Transplant outdoors 3-4' apart only when night time temperature stays above 50°F. Maturity dates are from the time of transplanting into the garden.

Determinate or bush tomato plants produce many short branches and grow only moderately after the fruits have formed. These compact plants have a concentrated fruit set and often do not require staking, unless desired to lift tomatoes off wet ground.

Indeterminate or climbing tomato plants are larger with more widely spaced branches which continue to vine after fruit has formed. Consequently, tomatoes ripen and can be harvested over a longer period of time. These plants should be both staked and pruned.